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Compaq Contura 4/25CX Bios update and question about changing the HDD

Vinpaq

Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
35
Location
The Netherlands
Hi all,

I would like to know where I can obtain the latest Bios version for my 4/25CX laptop, or at least check which version the latest version is.

I would also like to install a bigger HDD (for which I probably need the latest bios for), currently a 209mb hdd is installed. I have bought a (working) 40gb hdd and I made a 500mb fat16 partition (the primary). The computer won't start with this hdd installed, nothing, not even de bios. Installing the old hdd back in and it all works again.

Now I read something about "different geometries" of hdd's... has this something to do with it?


I have an ide to usb cable, checked the 40gb hdd with it (and also partitioned the hdd with it). But the 209mb hdd couldn't be read with it.


Last question, is it possible to have W95 and W3.11 as dualboot?
 

T-R-A

Veteran Member
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
580
Location
Western NC
If you're going larger than 540MB, then you might as well go with a drive overlay. Realize there's significant limits on drive/RAM sizes for such OS's as DOS/Win3.x & Win9x. And yes, you can dual-boot.
 

Svenska

Experienced Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2007
Messages
340
Location
Sweden
The computer won't start with this hdd installed, nothing, not even de bios.
Look on the drive whether it contains a jumper for "32 GB" mode and try that. It probably won't work, but is worth a shot.

I have an ide to usb cable, checked the 40gb hdd with it (and also partitioned the hdd with it). But the 209mb hdd couldn't be read with it.
The old drive does not support LBA addressing, while USB adapters do not support CHS addressing. Such adapters do not work with drives below approximately 400~500 MB.

Last question, is it possible to have W95 and W3.11 as dualboot?
Yes. MS-DOS first, then install Windows 95 into a separate directory. This approach has been supported by Microsoft, and both systems will share the same partition. Keep in mind that applications might be confused.

Therefore, a better approach is to use a boot manager such as XFDisk and install both operating systems into separate primary partitions. Keep in mind that *both* partitions must be accessible to the BIOS, so make sure to put them completely below the 1024 cylinder boundary.
 
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