• Please review our updated Terms and Rules here

Need help id'ing hardware-drum memory?

kazol

New Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
6
Sorry I don't have pix, but I have this small metal box that I think is a drum memory module. It has "Made in USSR" (in Russian) stamped on it with an infinite amount of serial numbers. It has 2 vaccuum tubes on it, located in a special metal holder. When I took the cover off, I saw this round dark red thing with a row of 10 contacts every 30 degrees, that could be rotated with an external axle. It made contact with a 10-contact connector on the bottom, which connected to individually soldered parts on top of each other. This was wired to the outside with a circular ~10 pin connector and another connector (I think it is for high voltage for the tubes). It is in mint condition and the even the tubes still work.

-What is this and is it worth bringing it to the US?
-How much would it cost and its rarity?

I have no idea where it came from; it was found in a bag with salvaged late 1980's era Soviet electronics parts (during that time food\products were impossible to get; anything of value-even wood would be salvaged).
 

chuckcmagee

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
1,992
Location
Nevada
Not drum memory. Sounds like some kind of counting device. It would provide pulses to added electronics to do the counting. Visions of those Wang Nixie tubes comes to mind (where the digits were made out of neon tubes shaped like the actual numbers and only one of the ten would light up in the stack at one time).


((ooooo, I should look for a working one of those! Better than a Coors beer sign even)).
 

kazol

New Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
6
So, do you think I should keep it and bring it? (I don't know how I'll get through airport security, but the last time I had a suitcase full of parts, vacuum tubes, meters, etc. and I got through with only 1 time being inspected.)

So Nixie tubes are rare?? I know a store which has boxes of them and sells them for ~50 cents. Are they worth buying?
 

chuckcmagee

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
1,992
Location
Nevada
Hmm, I personally don't think the "counting device" is worth much. Have no idea what it went into. As for the nixie tubes, I don't know if they are rare or not. I was just saying they would make a cool addition in a play room or something.
 

DimensionDude

Experienced Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
363
Location
Arkansas, USA
I don't think that nixie tubes are rare as in limited availability, just not seen in any new equipment. However, if you Google "nixie tube watch" you'll find kits for building nixie tube wristwatches and clocks. Coolness factor is very high 8)


Kent
 
Last edited:

nige the hippy

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2006
Messages
1,282
Location
Luton UK
Sorry I don't have pix, but I have this small metal box that I think is a drum memory module. It has "Made in USSR" (in Russian) stamped on it with an infinite amount of serial numbers. It has 2 vaccuum tubes on it, located in a special metal holder. When I took the cover off, I saw this round dark red thing with a row of 10 contacts every 30 degrees, that could be rotated with an external axle. It made contact with a 10-contact connector on the bottom, which connected to individually soldered parts on top of each other. This was wired to the outside with a circular ~10 pin connector and another connector (I think it is for high voltage for the tubes). It is in mint condition and the even the tubes still work.

sorry kazol, I know exactly what it is...

It's a turret tuner for a valve TV, each of those sections is tuned to a station, and you turn the knob to select the channel.

Might be of interest to a vintage TV person???
 

kazol

New Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
6
Thanks for the info. I would have never guessed it came from a TV.

Talking of TV's, I couldn't stop laughing at the TV that was in the room where I previously lived in.

I can't believe they were still making 10" b\w 15 tube TV's with all-manual controls in 1989!(the controls only work in 2 positions). The TV there even had an external power conditioner (whick looks like it was made in 1930) which makes you want to turn the volume all the way up.

The owner's "manual" was basically a 2x3 foot schematic :shock: of the TV, with the other side covered with parts lists and voltage checkpoints. I literally had to hit the back of the tv to prevent the screen from blanking out! :wallbang: Still works though. And I always keep wondering why it can work on 4 different voltages (selected on a knob in the back):confused:

Just for curiousity, what year did the US stopped making these kinds of TVs?
 

rmay635703

Veteran Member
Joined
May 29, 2003
Messages
512
Location
Wisconsin
Most manual TVs died out in 1979, though I will say I saw some still being sold in the mid 80's, can't say I've EVER seen a US made TV that could take more than one voltage as god knows 110v 60hz is the only kind of power in the world.
 
Top