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Network file sharing

GK2001

Experienced Member
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Jul 17, 2017
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180
I am at my wits' end trying to get an Ethernet connection between a Win7 and a Win10 machine working. At either end I have set up the desired shared drive and can see them from opposite ends, but neither computer will give me permission to access the other. I get the exact same message on both machines:

1657460806300.png
That is on the Win7 machine, trying to access drive D on the Win10 machine. It makes no difference if I log on as a general user or as an administrator. Who is my "network administrator" supposed to be? I've done everything here, except for the SMB stuff on the Win7 machine because it's not present in the "Turn Windows features on or off" list.

At either end, permissions are configured as follows:

1657461802076.png

Anyone have any ideas?
 
Last edited:

jafir

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You need to check NTFS permissions as well as the share permissions. Whichever is most restrictive wins.
 

GK2001

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Jul 17, 2017
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Oops, forgot to mention that. All groups and users have been granted full control:

1657462766458.png
 

Robbbert

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Could be a firewall thing. What happens if you turn it off?
 

commodorejohn

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Win10 is getting very persnickety about file-sharing outside of a full-fledged domain environment; I have to deal with this at work all the time. In addition to what's in that article, make sure on the Win10 end that the network type is set to Private, not Public. They've also started disabling anonymous guest access (there's a GP setting to re-enable it, but it seems to be a crapshoot whether it'll work,) so if you haven't already, set up a user account/password on the Win10 machine and map the shared drive using those credentials.
 

Agent Orange

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SE MI
I am at my wits' end trying to get an Ethernet connection between a Win7 and a Win10 machine working. At either end I have set up the desired shared drive and can see them from opposite ends, but neither computer will give me permission to access the other. I get the exact same message on both machines:

View attachment 1243437
That is on the Win7 machine, trying to access drive D on the Win10 machine. It makes no difference if I log on as a general user or as an administrator. Who is my "network administrator" supposed to be? I've done everything here, except for the SMB stuff on the Win7 machine because it's not present in the "Turn Windows features on or off" list.

At either end, permissions are configured as follows:

View attachment 1243438

Anyone have any ideas?
Did you use the W10 network setup wizard?
 

GK2001

Experienced Member
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Jul 17, 2017
Messages
180
I'm currently using a "public" network with passwords disabled, as that is what all of the "sharing files over ethernet" guides on-line tell you to do. It's just supposed to work without problems, according to the internet. This is a PITA to troubleshoot ATM because it's a walk through the backyard between machines. And the stupid "You do not have permission......" response gives me no hint as to where the problem is. I really hate all of this permissions and administrator BS - for a home computer I don't need any of it. I really wish Windows came with a configuration button to nuke all of this crap.
 

seaken

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Jun 20, 2016
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Shokan, New York
Browsing MS Network with mixed windows versions can be tricky and Win 10 keeps getting updated and hardened.

I have found it easier to bypass the "browsing" and use the machine's IP addresses. Set up the users on all machines to be identical with identical passwords. Setup shares on each and set permissions to the said user names you setup. Then login using the URL and it may ask you for the password, or it may just let you in. Enter password and then it will be remembered for next time.

After logging in using the URL/IP Address you can use the Mapping widget to map the share to a drive letter.

If this becomes too much trouble you can use a Remote Desktop and set/allow file & print sharing. I often resort to file transfers using Laplink or Filezilla, etc. Or an intermediary, like a NAS.

Seaken
 

Robbbert

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335
I set up a special account just for sharing, and it only has access to the folders that need to be shared. I always use the IP address, and a command-line for drive mapping, as the network neighborhood is always a hit & miss affair. With that, it always works both ways between win7 and win10.

The one that's more guesswork is getting time synchronisation between the computers, as most of my stuff is on a private, non-internet network. Sometimes it just works, and sometimes it's access denied, for no apparent reason.
 

GK2001

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Jul 17, 2017
Messages
180
I changed from public to private/home network types, but no dice. The problem is still exactly as previously - I can see the shared drives listed from either end, but access is blocked to the non-local drive. The ethernet connection between my machines is made via my wireless modem, which has four LAN ports. I guess this modem is acting as a router then?

I have had absolutely no luck getting anything at all to work when trying to specify IP addresses, despite following a few on-line guides to the letter. Does anyone know of any relevant on-line set-up guides that aren't worthless?
 

GK2001

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Jul 17, 2017
Messages
180
If this becomes too much trouble you can use a Remote Desktop and set/allow file & print sharing.


This, unfortunately, is only supported by the "Pro" version of Win10 and the "Premium" version of Win7. I only have the basic "Home" editions of both.
 

GK2001

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Jul 17, 2017
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180
I've got remote file sharing working now - I still can't figure out how to apply sharing permissions to allow remote access to a root directory specifying a drive partition, but any folder on any drive (and automatically all of the sub folders within) can be shared remotely.

For example, I can set drive D of my study computer to "shared", but that status doesn't automatically copy over to any of the contents of drive D. So then I can only see the root directory "d_drive_study" remotely on my shed computer, but don't have access to anything. However, I can set sharing permissions for any folder on D drive, such as "Photos", and those permissions will apply to all sub-folders of "Photos". "Photos" can then be fully accessed from my shed computer:


1657535998558.png


So to make D drive remotely accessible I just have to individually set sharing permissions for all folders one step up from D:\.

**Groan** I'm not sure how it makes sense for sharing permissions to die at the drive/directory root level. The "shared" status of a drive doesn't even override the sharing permissions of any folder on said drive when you disable it!
 
Last edited:

Robbbert

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Remote Desktop works fine on Win7 Pro - I've used it before, and I can see it in the menu of this Win7 Pro machine.
 

GK2001

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Jul 17, 2017
Messages
180
Remote Desktop works fine on Win7 Pro - I've used it before, and I can see it in the menu of this Win7 Pro machine.

Windows 7 Home Premium is the minimum version supporting Remote Desktop. Still doesn't help me as I have Windows 7 Home.
 

GK2001

Experienced Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2017
Messages
180
The ethernet connection between my machines is made via my wireless modem, which has four LAN ports. I guess this modem is acting as a router then?


Well the modem is automatically providing internet access to both computers without me having to set up or configure anything specific to internet sharing.

Just a security question now. I am right to presume that my sharing permissions only apply to devices physically wired to my little ethernet network and not potentially anyone trying to get in over my internet connection?
 
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