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mbbrutman

Associate Cat Herder
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No, it doesn't. Have you ever seen a vector display for real, or just emulated versions of them? There is quite a difference - a vector display has no pixels, just lines.
 

atari2600a

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May 26, 2006
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Schwarzeneggerville, CA
Yes, I've seen actual vector displays before. Trust me, MAME has some pretty decent vector simulation. (It doesn't deserve the rank of "emulation") Sometimes, you just have to tweak the vector settings in the mame.ini file a little

..yet It still doesn't feel right whilst playing it via MAME...

EDIT: Come to think of it, the corners of vector graphics in MAME never really looked right (yet... :p)
 

Vlad

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Jul 3, 2005
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Both of you knock it off. This entire little exchange is uncalled for and just distracts from the topic at hand. Give it a rest and let it go, there is no need for this to turn into some second grade flame fest.

-VK
 

carlsson

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Jul 30, 2003
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I saw my first Vectrex this spring, and I was almost a bit disappointed. I had thought it would have even more crisp vectors and not so pronounced end points.
 

TroyW

Experienced Member
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Aug 28, 2006
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144
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Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Also, it's not like this is a niche product. You're talking about something that has sold in the tens of millions and counting, ensuring they will be in the supply chain (eBay, flea markets, whatever) for at least the next 30 years or so.

Yes and no, in some ways I'd agree and other ways I wouldn't. I plan on getting myself a Sony PS2 when the PS3 comes out, as well as a reasonable collection of games and spare controllers, memory cards, etc. Why? Because after the system is superceeded, it will cease to be a mainstream product, and availability will slowly dry up, just like it has for other systems that people have moved on from. I learnt that lesson years ago when it came to consoles, ending up with a console that works perfectly asides from some fault such as a controller that was broken beyond repair and being unable to find a replacement.

In fact, that is a problem that affects older computers as well as consoles - my beloved Amiga 4000 is practically useless at the moment because the hard disk, floppy drive and mouse are all dead and beyond repair (at least, beyond any repairs I could do) and I have no idea where the keyboard that goes with it ended up, so before I can use it again, I have to replace the keyboard, mouse, floppy drive (and good luck finding one of the fairly rare 1.76Mb half speed 3.5" drives that were used in the A4000) and hard disk, then hope that the floppy disks I still have that I hadn't had a chance to backup to a different medium still work. Oh and then I'll want to replace the battery that started to leak onto the motherboard, so I removed it, but alas it took part of the battery mounting with it, so that needs to be repaired too if I want it to remember the date and time.

So if you're really worried, buy several of whatever machine you particularly like, as well as any things that plug into it like controllers, so you've got your own personal stash, saving you from being stuck like I am with my Amiga 4000.

Anyway, back to the topic.

I've been playing computer games for most of my life, from "Radar Rat Race" on the Vic 20 and "Star Raiders" and "Oils Well" on the Atari 400 to name just a few, right through to Gran Turismo 4 on the PS2. My favourites aren't usually the "itchy trigger finger" games, I particularly like games that make me laugh or think, and so the space quest series, as well as the monkey island series are among my favourites, but being a car enthusiast, I'm also a big fan of car racing game simulations such as the Gran Turismo series & live for speed, not really such a big fan of the more "arcade orientated" titles such as the need for speed series.
 

Bill_Loguidice

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Mar 13, 2006
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Central New Jersey, USA
I saw my first Vectrex this spring, and I was almost a bit disappointed. I had thought it would have even more crisp vectors and not so pronounced end points.

I have two Vectrex units. One does not converge as well as the other, so it could have been the particular unit you were looking at. In other words, one I have connects the lines perfectly, the other does not do so nearly as well. The latter also buzzes louder. They can be finnicky machines for obvious reasons, but it truly is the most unique console from a display standpoint ever made and likely will be made for quite some time (and yes, I include the Virtual Boy in there). The homebrew scene is also tremendous, second only to the Atari 2600 one.
 

mbbrutman

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I saw my first Vectrex this spring, and I was almost a bit disappointed. I had thought it would have even more crisp vectors and not so pronounced end points.

It's home equipment .. it wasn't affordable to make it to the standards that the arcade vector units had to meet.

I need to get my hands on an Atari Star Wars, which was a color vector unit and one of their last vector units.

The downside of any vector unit is repairs .. you just can't pop in a normal tube.
 

carlsson

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Jul 30, 2003
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Västerås, Sweden
Actually, the guy had two Vectrex units side by side. Dunno if they were of the exact same model/origin. It was the same guy who owns 10++ boxed systems and all kind of games including a newly bought copy of Mr. Boston.
 
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