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Microsoft's Windows 10 upgrade adware keeps coming back!

GottaLottaStuff

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I know I can set it up to dual boot Win 7 and Win 10. The thing is, it looks like 30 days after you upgrade to Win 10, your Win 7 product key doesn't work for Win 7 anymore. So you can't have both without buying another copy of Win 7. Or am I reading that wrong?
 

Agent Orange

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Ever hear of Grub? Or does that not work with Win10 partitions?

Don't know if does or not. But, most newer mobo's let you select the boot drive via the F8, for example. No need for third party stuff. I do use System Commander on some of my older boxes.
 

Agent Orange

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I know I can set it up to dual boot Win 7 and Win 10. The thing is, it looks like 30 days after you upgrade to Win 10, your Win 7 product key doesn't work for Win 7 anymore. So you can't have both without buying another copy of Win 7. Or am I reading that wrong?

Never heard that one. I have a 3 user family pack for W7 Home. I've used it over and over after upgrading to W8 with no problems. Wouldn't surprise me if it were true though.
 

Doug G

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Ever hear of Grub? Or does that not work with Win10 partitions?
I recently got a Dell micro desktop Celeron desktop with w10 (an i3050). It's set up to use secure boot/uefi, and it dual boots with centos7 using grub as the bootloader just fine.
 

GiGaBiTe

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A free OS update isn't quite as favorable when thousands need to be spent upgrading other software.

Windows 10's "free update" isn't really free, you're exchanging your Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 key for a Windows 10 key. I've heard from some sources that once you upgrade, MS blacklists your key so you can't use it for the former OS again without calling them, but I've not confirmed it.

Another scary update is KB3123862, which just came out recently. The description is a cryptic one liner:

"This update adds capabilities to some computers that lets users easily learn about Windows 10 or start an upgrade to Windows 10."

It replaces Explorer.exe (The Windows Desktop program) with a different version, ExplorerFrame.dll which has all of the UI resources (icons, bitmaps, menus, etc.), Shell32.dll (core of the Windows UI) and Authui.dll (Controls Windows logins). I think it's just installing telemetry/spyware deeper in your system rather than helping you with anything. More like helping itself to your data.
 

KC9UDX

Space Commander
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Oh I feel so left out. I still haven't gotten a popup telling me I need Windows 10.:rolleyes:
 

yuhong

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Messages
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Windows 10's "free update" isn't really free, you're exchanging your Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 key for a Windows 10 key. I've heard from some sources that once you upgrade, MS blacklists your key so you can't use it for the former OS again without calling them, but I've not confirmed it.
With Win10 having an uninstall, I don't believe this claim.
 

GiGaBiTe

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With Win10 having an uninstall, I don't believe this claim.

Like LottaStuff said, it's only valid for a month and then Windows 10 deletes the old Windows install. The claims I read were about nuking Windows 10 and reinstalling from scratch, which is when they found out their keys no longer worked without calling MS.

I wouldn't trust the Windows 10 uninstall feature anyway. It's the first and only version of Windows with an uninstall option, and since upgrading Windows is usually a disastrous process, I'd assume the uninstall is even more so.
 

krebizfan

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I had to uninstall Windows 10 on one system since a program broke from the upgrade. The uninstall was successful. Actually, better than successful since the email collected in the days running Windows 10 remained after the rollback to Windows 7.

Windows 10 is not the first upgrade with the ability to uninstall. Win98, XP, 7 and 8 all had methods to uninstall an upgrade. Windows 10's implementation is improved over the previous attempts.
 

Osgeld

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Feb 20, 2016
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Tennessee
I had a giggle fest on a dumpy core2 machine laying around where I took windows 7 32 bit home, upgraded it to 10 and downgraded it back to 7

4 times

first upgrade lost my USB host stuff and I was stuck without a mouse, downgrade back to 7 and still without mouse
uninstalled host driver, reinstalled after reboot back to normal

second upgrade it could not find my prolific USB to serial bridge, which is not uncommon, but downgrade back to 7 where it was working driver did not roll back ... again and had to manually install it

third time no hardware issues, decided my installed copy of visual C# express was bad and brokeded it, downgrade back still broke

fourth time flawless, so it seems windows 10 is learning, one day taking over the earth in a skynet fashion

btw everytime I downgraded back to 7 the first thing to pop up was a upgrade to windows 10 nag message
 

KC9UDX

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Do other operating systems have a built in uninstaller? I can't think of any I've used.
 

Chuck(G)

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There are package managers in *nix that might well do the same thing. But other OSes use a different system to hold configuration information, which is a real advantage (no "registry").
 

KC9UDX

Space Commander
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Pkgsrc won't uninstall a Unix.

The registry is a disaster. The Amiga way works very well and is very user friendly. Unfortunately some people out there think the registry is a good thing and every operating system should have one.
 

KC9UDX

Space Commander
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Yeah, it's not simple--but at least things are fairly neatly partitioned, unlike Windows.

At least there's no registry, so I've been able to re-install down-version *nix distros over the newer ones without too much trouble.
And surely you had no trouble copying software from one machine to another.

That's my biggest (of many) gripes with the registry. You can't just copy a working program from one machine to the next upon upgrading.
 

GiGaBiTe

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Pkgsrc won't uninstall a Unix.

The registry is a disaster. The Amiga way works very well and is very user friendly. Unfortunately some people out there think the registry is a good thing and every operating system should have one.

When I first moved from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95, I thought the registry was a godsend. Instead of having to hunt down hundreds of INI and PIF files to change settings, you could use regedit and configure everything from a central program manually if need be.

But the registry didn't age well and by the end of the Windows 9x era, it became a PITA to have around due to increasing complexity and the all too common possibility of massive corruption that breaks Windows.

*nix suffers from the same problem Windows 3.1 did, thousands of config files with thousands of different ways to configure them. There's no defacto standard other than the awful new Systemd that tries to stick its tendrils in everything and causes even more problems. It's getting harder and harder to find a modern SysV based Linux today that isn't overly complex to use.
 
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