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Musical Types

CP/M User

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"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Some music just can't be put into any single category.

True, I think I mentioned earlier that many Rock groups might have an emphasis on another swing or in some events do something entirely different from one day to the next - usually has an impact when some changes to a groups line-up have occured, not always though.

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carlsson

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Most or all "popular" music is related to eachother and cross-bread. Folk, blues, jazz, rock, pop, country, hard rock.. the list can go on.

Funny that you should mention BST. One of my favorite groups are The Ides of March, based in Chicago since the mid 60'ties but got their big break in 1970 after adopting the BST horns and got one Billboard top position with "Vehicle". A few years later, they seemed to drift into country style and replaced a few members. Then the band took a break until the early 1990's and has since then recorded a few new albums and goes on yearly mini tours around Chicago. I found out about them by luck, when I found their second album (Common Bond) in a pile of LPs bought from the auction. Even more luck, my local record store had the other three albums in, all in very good condition. I might even consider to import the recent CD recordings.

Otherwise, I listen to most music. Classical music, marches, movies, musical, pop, rock, jazz, blues, novelty and so on. Playing in a concert band has to some extent opened my view for classical music, but I keep finding great works that are too complex or too traditional to play, so I have to live with only listening to recordings. :wink:
 

Terry Yager

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carlsson said:
Most or all "popular" music is related to eachother and cross-bread. Folk, blues, jazz, rock, pop, country, hard rock.. the list can go on.

It's all fusion/crossover/derivative/influenced these days. Every artist/group "borrows" something from those who've come before (which is partly what keeps music "alive"...everyone adds a little of thier own to what has already been done).

--T
 

carlsson

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I play the alto saxophone, although I do have a resonably playable oboe in the closet. With playable, I mean that someone who knows how to play the instrument would be able to use it, not that I can play it. But I've tried!

http://www.anders.sfks.se/mp3/send_in_the_oboe.mp3

The ultimate goal for artists who mix and derive from known genres must be to create their own genre or at least variation. It seems almost all styles have sub-styles with its distinct followers. Take hard rock as an example. First, it divided into heavy metal. Then we got speed metal, slow metal, death metal, fairy tale metal (or whatever) and I'm sure those also have been tagged into sub-categories. As long as the band always plays the same kind of music, it is enough to make it just a little bit different from the other, and voila, you got yourself a new genre variation.
 

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"Terry Yager" wrote:

> It's all fusion/crossover/derivative/influenced these days. Every
> artist/group "borrows" something from those who've come before
> (which is partly what keeps music "alive"...everyone adds a little of thier
> own to what has already been done).

I tend to think that everyone has been borrowing something for quite sometime. For instance Folk (which I'm kinda limited to) was present in POP groups back in the 1960s, Pete Seeger came before that - though played more Traditional Folk. Harry Belafonte did a bit of everything from Calypso to a bit of Folk as well. The Weavers though (with Seeger & Co. getting into hot water over), sets the scene for groups like Peter, Paul & Mary, The Springfields (before Dusty went Solo) & Aussies own Seekers. Dylan was writing his own brand of Folk. Guess it's different from borrowing something else - perhaps they were more previliaged! ;-)

Can't see how they Fuse Folk to something heavy - it just would sound right!

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carlsson

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Speaking of which, I still have another SB Live! card in my desk drawer. So far, I've hesitated to install it after all the sh*t experience I had with the first Live, and live with an older SB AudioPCI. Maybe I should give it a try, as it should have up to three MIDI synths and possibly better audio output.

The bad one is a CT4830 from 1999, the untested one is a CT4780 from 2000.
 

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"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I just googled "French Folk Music" and there's lots of hits, including MP-3
> d/l sites, if ya wanna hear some for yourself...

I did a search for this yesturday, but it came up with just a lot of sites with
the term "French Folk Music". I tried narrowing this down by including the
term "MP3" with "French Folk Music" though it just seemed to have sites
beiefly mentioning "French Folk Music" & suggesting other musical sites
with MP3s! :-(

I also tried www.mp3.com but couldn't really work out who performs this
type of music - I went into Folk on there, but just went into Tradional
Folk & Contempory Folk - they should of had a sub-category for French
Folk - but none to my avail. :-(

Terry, if you have more luck finding sites, artists for this - could you
please post them here.

Thanks,
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