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Why isn't there a category for Sun Microsystems?

OldPro

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Jul 4, 2024
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Why doesn't Sun have its own company category on this forum? Is this something that can be added? There are a fair number of Sun enthusiasts, and their systems go all the way back to the early 80s and span three or four different CPU architectures.

Seems to me like they deserve their own category.
 
I don't think the volume of messages justifies a change, it's not as if one has to spend a lot of time separating the wheat from the chaff in this forum.
 
I think this is the first of one of the very few topics about Sun in the last year.
If there is enough interest a category would probably be created, right now sporadic posts can be created in this subforum.
 
Correct. Category creation is based on activity.

Personally, I’d love to see more Sun activity here, but it hasn’t happened, so far.

- Alex
 
There are quite a few forums for Sun's in other places - eg. the sun rescue list and a certain popular social network which has quite a few Sun groups including those for ex Sun employees. I've learnt a lot about the Sun work culture, early days and development of the machines in these groups so definitely recommend.
 
I think this is the first of one of the very few topics about Sun in the last year.
If there is enough interest a category would probably be created, right now sporadic posts can be created in this subforum.
I counted 12 threads about sun in the last year just on the first 2 pages. Plus several older threads with new comments.
 
I counted 12 threads about sun in the last year just on the first 2 pages. Plus several older threads with new comments.

Fair enough, I wasn't paying attention.
Indeed, if you browse the pages of the category there's a Sun thread on every page.
 
Why doesn't Sun have its own company category on this forum? Is this something that can be added? There are a fair number of Sun enthusiasts, and their systems go all the way back to the early 80s and span three or four different CPU architectures.

Seems to me like they deserve their own category.
I love Sun myself and have 3 SPARC systems. That said, there are 6k messages here for all Unix workstations total... How would Sun be better served by a separate category?
 
I love Sun myself and have 3 SPARC systems. That said, there are 6k messages here for all Unix workstations total... How would Sun be better served by a separate category?
It's easier to understand if you look at it from the other direction. How is Apple better served by being in a separate category? It's not, it better serves everything else by not drowning them out in Apple posts.
 
I have many Sun systems, the oldest being my Sun 3/50 and my Sun 3/280, and the newest being my Sun Ultra 45. So, no dislike for Sun here. But, as previously mentioned, a lot of discussion for Sun systems happens elsewhere.

If that changes, and more discussion happens here, I’d be happy to create a category for it.

- Alex
 
It sucks that we can't have a large and diverse selection of subforums for unix/xenix/linux but as mentioned there's not an awful lot of activity here to begin with.
 
FWIW, I don't own a Sun and am unlikely to do so, but used them lots in the 90s (Sun3s, Sun4, SS1, SS2) I enjoy seeing threads about other computers and moving into its own sub genre would probably mean I wouldn't read about other systems / trials of other owners - which I think is a pity.
 
I volunteer at the Rhode Island Computer Museum, and I rarely have someone ask about Sun systems. Maybe if we were in California...
 
I volunteer at the Rhode Island Computer Museum, and I rarely have someone ask about Sun systems. Maybe if we were in California...
I'll ask about them if I ever make it out there. I actually just watched a youtube video going through your warehouse and noticed you guys had some sun machines but never talked about them.
 
I actually just watched a youtube video going through your warehouse and noticed you guys had some sun machines but never talked about them.
We have some 3/60 systems, IPC & IPX, Enterprise 4500. The most interesting Sun thing is a Wollemi UltraSPARC Prototype. With little interest in them they just sit in the warehouse.
 
Having a bunch of empty and unused forums can be discouraging for someone joining the forum. That's why we don't just create everything possible.

As said, though, if the discussions happen, I'm happy to create them. So, start talking about Suns here, and encourage others to do the same, and we'll all be happy. :)

- Alex
 
I volunteer at the Rhode Island Computer Museum, and I rarely have someone ask about Sun systems. Maybe if we were in California...
Suns (server and workstation) were quite common in the late pre-commercial-internet era at universities on the east coast. My ex-wife's school had giant labs of Sun IPCs, and mine NeXTs. But much like the internet itself, most people alive at the time were not involved in it, so they wouldn't even know what to ask about. There are a ton of people who were students at the time who probably used Unix shells to access Usenet and such, and to this day have little idea what kind of computer they were actually running on. And then SGI, SGI captured a lot more mainstream attention, even if people had only a vague idea of what kind of computers they were.

If I were at a museum, I would consider it an obligation to educate people about Unix servers and workstations. And VAX/VMS for that matter, which no doubt has even less interest outside computer circles. They are just as important as IBM mainframes, and significantly more interesting IMO. People don't necessarily come in knowing already what is cool technology.

People are going to have nostalgia for what they used or at least knew about, and for most people, the internet starts with AOL on their home PC, and computers start with the Apple II at school. That a mass produced $1000-5000 (not adjusted) PC may have the same value as a $10,000-50,000 (not adjusted) workstation on the used market today may be absurd, but that's just supply and demand... All the better for those of us who know what the real prizes are.

The importance of Unix (and Sun in particular) doesn't really extended to making forums here that would be underutilized, especially when much of the discussion is taking place elsewhere. I agree with what most have said that this forum is more than adequate, and interest in Suns is extremely unlikely to increase going forward.
 
If I were at a museum, I would consider it an obligation to educate people about Unix servers and workstations. And VAX/VMS for that matter, which no doubt has even less interest outside computer circles. They are just as important as IBM mainframes, and significantly more interesting IMO. People don't necessarily come in knowing already what is cool technology.
We have a working NEXT Cube on display if someone wants to play with UNIX. I also plan to write a DECtape handler for UNIX V0 so we can run it on the PDP-9. We have a volunteer who is enthusiastic about VMS, so we will move a VAX-3500 from the warehouse and the volunteer will get it running and on display. Until someone volunteers to resurrect one of the Sun systems they will stay in the warehouse.
 
We have a working NEXT Cube on display if someone wants to play with UNIX. I also plan to write a DECtape handler for UNIX V0 so we can run it on the PDP-9. We have a volunteer who is enthusiastic about VMS, so we will move a VAX-3500 from the warehouse and the volunteer will get it running and on display. Until someone volunteers to resurrect one of the Sun systems they will stay in the warehouse.

I'm not blaming your for not having Suns on display I'm just a Sun fanboy that thinks there should be Suns everywhere.
 
I have spent almost 35 years working on *nix, across many flavors, but initially focused on Sun (SunOS/Solaris) systems. Sun had an immensely broad following until the acquisition by Oracle. Oracle did an enormous amount of damage to the community through their actions around OpenSolaris, Java, and massive price increases. Many folks dropped out of the community, at that point, or moved their *nix enthusiasm to other platforms.

F*ck Larry Ellison.

- Alex
 
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