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Windows Visual Studio

Chuck(G)

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I don't know--these were pretty much the standard tool for MSDN Windows development. I used pretty much only the C compilers from mine and left the rest of the CDs unused.

I don't think that they're very rare.
 

barythrin

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It's not rare but depending on your audience perhaps if someone is looking for an easy way to develop or learn programming on Windows 9x that version of Studio might be useful. I'm not sure what sort of demand there is for mid-90s programming languages quite yet.
 

Mike Chambers

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It's not rare but depending on your audience perhaps if someone is looking for an easy way to develop or learn programming on Windows 9x that version of Studio might be useful. I'm not sure what sort of demand there is for mid-90s programming languages quite yet.

I'd personally not mess with anything older than VS 6 for Win 9x.
 

SomeGuy

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Developer tools like that can sometimes sell for a bit because A) sometimes businesses need them for maintaining legacy software, and B) developers nostalgic for that sort of thing sometimes... sometimes have been doing programming for a long time and have a lot of money.

I'm guessing you are talking about Visual Studio 4.0? I don't think they ever called it "95", although users may have.

It is not clear how much demand there is for that specific version (most businesses would be looking for VS 6), but if you throw it up on eBay, I think a starting price of $100 to $200 wouldn't be too crazy. A well recognized product like that would probably get enough attention that you need not worry much about underestimating the value. If it doesn't sell, just knock the price down to $75 or $50 and someone would likely grab it.
 

dorkbert

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most business that codes for a living probably spring for MSDN subscription, and would have full suite of OS and Dev tools. IIRC DDK was only available via MSDN.
 

SpidersWeb

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Personally I'd only expect it to be worth $5-10. (But that's just me).
Still a good idea to either hold on to it for a few more years, or pass it on to somebody who wants to (here or ebay for $$).
 

krebizfan

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The readiness pack was offered as an accessory with Visual Studio 6. Thus, I expect the entire thing is VS 6.
 

Chuck(G)

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DDKs for Windows availability varied with time. For Win 3.0-3.1, it was a special-order item (I have that one, boxed), back when Microsoft maintained a tech line on Compuserve (and device driver registration numbers). Later, while you could still get the DDK separately from MS, joining MSDN made more financial sense. Sometime around Vista, MS just started offering DDKs for download, free. I don't know what the situation is now.
 
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