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Accessing Win10 Network share from Win98se

ibmapc

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Has anyone been able to "Map A Network Drive" on a Win98 machine to access a shared drive on a Win10 machine? I can go the other way, i.e. my Win10 machine can access shared drives on my Win98se machine no problem. But, when I try to access a shared drive on the Win10 machine from Win98, I get a message stating that a password is required and when I enter a password for the admin on the Win10 machine I get an incorrect password error.
 

GiGaBiTe

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I've had this issue before, you have to fiddle with the "advanced sharing settings" under the "network and sharing center" in the control panel. Usually turning off password protected sharing and setting the file sharing connection to 40/56 bit encryption allows older versions of Windows to connect to shared directories.

Sometimes though you'll have to create a new user account on the shared machine and create privileges for that account.
 

ibmapc

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Yup, I've tried all of those things, repeatedly. No Joy. Thank you for the reply though. I may just need to get my tweener going again.

Greg
 

gonk23

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I don't have any experience with this, but have you tried enabling SMB 1.0 in "Turn Windows features on or off" ? Windows 10 uses a later version of SMB and later builds disable this apparently.
 

ngtwolf

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I don't have any experience with this, but have you tried enabling SMB 1.0 in "Turn Windows features on or off" ? Windows 10 uses a later version of SMB and later builds disable this apparently.

I've also not had experience with accessing shares on windows 98 to a Windows 10 machine, however I did have this exact issue with 98 accessing Samba network shares on my NAS. The issues with my Samba share were related to needing support for lanman, which in my case were fixed by enabling lanman authorization. ('lanman auth = yes'). In Samba, when this setting is not enabled, only clients which support NT password hashes (ie. NT/2000/etc) can access. Unfortunately how this works in Windows 10, I don't know. I only know the way to fix it on a true Samba file share.

A quick search on the topic brought this up, which might direct you to how to fix it. I assume you need to support LM & NTLM.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...ork-security-lan-manager-authentication-level

It looks like the default is to support NTLMv2, which is most likely your problem.
 

Lutiana

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Microsoft turns of NTLMv1 by default now. This is because there are some pretty scary security flaws in it, which have been leveraged to spread quite a few things, most notably ransomware in recent years. Windows 98 can only use NTLMv1 and not v2 which Windows 10 uses, but the Win10 machine can still connect to v1 shares. Hence your ability to go Win10 -> Win98 but not the other way around.

I would not recommend enabling v1 on your Windows 10 machine and just push files to your win98 machine, and not the other way around. This is especially true if your Win10 machine is portable and will end up on other networks or has some public exposure on the file sharing side of things.
 

SpidersWeb

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As above, Windows 10 will connect to Windows 98PCs however and I recommend just doing it in that direction, setup the share on Windows 98.

Another option is to get a little cheap Core 2 Duo machine, install Linux, install Samba, setup a share and turn off all those pesky security measures - then both the Win10 and Win98 box can see it, and it's not full of your personal documents. Some of the mini office machines are good as they're power efficient and quiet, one of mine uses a laptop power supply.
 

ibmapc

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Well, there's always ftp and ssh; I believe that both platforms support the former--and possibly the latter.

Yes, I did FTP with Filezilla server on the Win10 PC and Filezilla client on the Win98 PC (Internet explorer is horrible with maintaining the connection to Filezilla server. It keeps failing without notice because evidently the password needs to be re sent). It works OK but not possible to run a program from the network. It must be downloaded and then ran locally.

...Another option is to get a little cheap Core 2 Duo machine, install Linux, install Samba, setup a share and turn off all those pesky security measures - then both the Win10 and Win98 box can see it, and it's not full of your personal documents. Some of the mini office machines are good as they're power efficient and quiet, one of mine uses a laptop power supply.

Thank @SpidersWeb, this sorta what I did. In a previous reply I said "I may just need to get my tweener going again.". My previous Tweener started having hard disk issues so I have been not wanting to turn it on until I have the time to back it up completely.

The following is the work around that I've come up with for now. Let me know what you guys think security wise.

  1. Install Oracle Virtual box on the Win10 PC
  2. Create a Win2000 Pro Virtual PC
  3. Share a folder on the Win2k VM that the host (Win10) and the Win98 PC can access via a bridged network connection between the VM Virtual NIC and the Host WIFI NIC.

This is slightly cumbersome because the VM needs to be started and run in the background(minimized) each time the Win10 PC or the Win98 PC need to access the shared drive. But it does work pretty well indeed.

Anyone know how to get the VM to start automatically? In older versions of windows I would just put the shortcut in the startup folder but I cant figure that out with Win10.

Thanks again for all of the responses,

Greg
 
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