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Calling all origina media owners

Micom 2000

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2004
Messages
1,284
Location
Manitoba North of 50 degrees Latitude
The P-Betti mirror site is amazing. I'm also looking forward to the Fritz Kwolkas CPM files.
I didn't even realize the download site had gone. Fortunately his Tandy m2 site is still up.
He was my hero in an earlier era of a paucity of info on all the TRS-80 sites re the model 2.

http://home.iae.nl/users/pb0aia/cm/modelii.html

Incidentally it also provides a desciption to build a cable to write 8" disks on a 5 1/2' HD drive.

Unfortunately I was unable to find some of his other sites including one which took you on a visual tour of his home which had integrated dozens of computers into his tastefull decor.
It was inspiring.

With the price of gigabyte HDs so low I find it surprising that so many of these vintage download sites are disappearing. There seem to be many providers hosted by vintage enthusiasts. I've seen many offering to host vintage sites free. Granted there is a cost for broadband, but the traffic must be minimal, and could be supplemented if necessary by advertising should it get too active. Am I missing something here ?

Lawrence
 

lyates

New Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2009
Messages
2
I'd sure like a genuine Kaypro 2X image.
Do you have an FTP site?

Thanls!
-Larry
 

Chuck(G)

25k Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2007
Messages
40,242
Location
Pacific Northwest, USA
Yes, that's why MOVCPM is not portable between different systems/models.

Actually, if the OEM did their MOVCPM according to DRI's terms of service, it's not even compatible between systems of the same make and model--each copy is supposed to have a unique serial number. Try to run MOVCPM on a system with a different serial number and you get "Synchronization Error" and a hang.
 

patscc

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2005
Messages
2,311
Location
Stevens Point, Wisconsin
Archive

Archive

I actually have spare capacity & bandwidth on a web host, so if anyone is really interested in getting an organized archive of some sort going, I can probably provide the infrastructure. Anyone interested ?
The only thing I don't want is yet another file dump, like Simtel. Anything archived should have some sort of documentation attached that can be parsed by a search mechanism, and preferably some description by a VCF'er that the program( or whatever ) actually does what it's supposed to do, unlike Shark's problem with the Kaypro images.
It would be nice if you could traverse via http & ftp as well. I suppose gopher would be too much. Ideally the navigation pages should have minimalist structure, or at least a text version so that it's accessible from older browsers as well.
Aside from just mirroring the archive, I think it would make sense if a few hardcopy DVD's of the site were periodically distributed around. That way there would be a physical copy of it as well.
patscc
 

Lorne

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2008
Messages
1,164
Location
Chandler, AZ, USA
@ Sharkonwheels:

I've got original disks (working) for the Altos 5/15.

The labels on all three indicate they are for Series 5

For example:

CPM disk label.jpg

The three are:
CP/M version 2.2SO
Altos Diag. Exec. version 3.0
MP/M version 2.10SO

You want a copy?
 

gerrydoire

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
1,145
Icb tips

Icb tips

Well, unfortunatly, I don't have any CP/M stuff, at all. Getting a Kaypro is towards the bottom of my priorities(just above getting a proper edumacation, and below getting a real job, not just my "home business." But anyhow, when you come up with the archive, make sure to keep it on CD, and send it to people who want it. The best way you can make sure data isn't lost is to back it up, share it, and put it on reliable media.

--Ryan

The AT&T Shrine needs an AT&T ICB Board, made specifically for that computer, but it also works with other PC Compatibles...

It's a full length baord that does image capturing from a RCA input, it also has RCA Output.

:D
 

Lohmeyer

Experienced Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2008
Messages
50
Location
San Jose, CA, USA
I actually have spare capacity & bandwidth on a web host, so if anyone is really interested in getting an organized archive of some sort going, I can probably provide the infrastructure. Anyone interested ?

Yes.

I am already archiving some stuff that apparently isn't on the net, with the plans to make it available - BUT - my intent is quality over quantity, and I'll do it in such a way that if I disappear, it'll still be available some how. With all due respect to the people over the years that build these sites and archive stuff (and these people do massively deserve our respect and thanks!), if you don't do it so as to guarantee it'll be available forever, then you aren't really helping the community. People end up depending on the site, think it's going to be there, and then it disappears. Or worse, everyone leeches the entire site (expecting it to disappear tomorrow), causing bandwidth problems and forcing the site to shut down.

It isn't good enough to just make a file repository and mirror it either. Files by themselves without an explanation of what is what and why anyone cares isn't good enough.

As you say....

The only thing I don't want is yet another file dump, like Simtel. Anything archived should have some sort of documentation attached that can be parsed by a search mechanism, and preferably some description by a VCF'er that the program( or whatever ) actually does what it's supposed to do, unlike Shark's problem with the Kaypro images.

There are lots of archives of disparate files & docs. With no descriptions, and with many duplicates, people tend to download everything they can get without concern for whether they need it. Then sites shut down due to lack of money, or because sys-ops get upset from all the leeching without any support back to the site. These servers cost real money. It could easily cost you hundreds of $ a year to run an archive site. Take http://trs-80.com for example. So much great effort put forth, but now largely inaccessible. Note, how this also creates the situation where people that contributed stuff to the site get upset when they thought that stuff would be maintained and available, but then it disappears.

My focus on collecting vintage computers is as much for other people's sake as it is my own. I'm going to spend my effort and money to archive stuff in a way that everyone can reach it, and so it won't disappear. I know, it's easy to say, and hard to do. I know exactly what I'm saying. But, I'm getting tired of all the fantastic web resources showing up and then disappearing several years later. I'm not just talking about vintage computers. I've been annoyed by this problem for years regarding all of my hobbies where I have sometimes had to beg someone to please pass the archive or ownership of a site on to someone else before it's lost, and getting no traction because the person is just burnt out and doesn't care anymore.

A perfect example is the hours and hours of time I spent helping people on a vintage motorcycle forum with questions and knowledge that nobody else knew, expecting that the archives of the forum would always be available. Then a couple years ago, the owner of the site summarily deleted all old posts without even offering to let anyone archive them. I was not happy. Disk space is so cheap now, there's no reason to delete stuff. Bandwidth is the issue now. I can't even refer back to all my old posts to answer questions anymore. I should have typed it all into web pages and linked to it from the forum.

So, here I am getting more involved in vintage computers, and this time, I am building a web site where whatever wisdom, documents, software, etc. that I offer will be on my web site, and linked from forums rather than posted in the forums (no, it's not up yet - I'm slow, but I get there eventually). And, short of getting run over by a bus tomorrow, I will make sure it is never lost - even if I have to put it in my will.

Sorry, above is a bit of a rant, and maybe a little idealistic, but if you really love vintage stuff, then you should do whatever you can to preserve it for others to see. Plus remember, we are the generation that grew up on this stuff. When we are gone, the first hand knowledge will be gone with us. Hopefully our web sites will live on.

Regards,
Mike
 
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