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hey everybody...im new with a few questions

Joined
Dec 4, 2012
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First of all, I know nothing about computers but I want to know ...if I said I wanted a working mac2 that is functional to play games on, what does that mean and where do I start? Also, I would want an original, not a reproduction or emulator.
 

Hatta

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Omaha, NE
I'd start by posting in the Wanted forum here, and maybe sign up for 68kmla.org or applefritter.com. The compact macs are a lot more common than a Mac II though, so I'd go for that unless you really have your heart set on having the first modular macintosh.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2012
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Remember that I don't know a single thing about computers so if possible, can you explain and Maby give links to photos of these things. I want to start learning and not just rely on you guys for everything..thank you for replying.
 

olePigeon

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My suggestion for a good, solid Mac for vintage gaming with lots of future possibilities (should he get "the bug") would be a Macintosh IIci. It's plenty expandable (3 nubus, PDS slot, up to 128MBs of RAM), reasonably fast (68030), can be had for fairly cheap (under $50), fairly easy to find, can use both 24-bit and 32-bit memory mode (important for compatibility), and can run everything from System 6 to 7.6 in its stock configuration.

My alternate suggestion would be a Quadra 605 or LC III. Fast CPU, good amount of memory, and you can use an Apple IIe card in it should he also want to experiment with Apple II stuff (though a real Apple II might cheaper at this point.)
 

wmmullaney

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First of all, I know nothing about computers but I want to know ...if I said I wanted a working mac2 that is functional to play games on, what does that mean and where do I start? Also, I would want an original, not a reproduction or emulator.

You're posting in an Apple II forum, do you want a Macintosh II or an Apple II? New users get confused, but they are completely different computers.
 

barythrin

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Oct 5, 2005
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Texas
Is there a reason you're looking for one? Was there a specific game or time frame you were wanting to experience? An Apple II is the older all-in-one keyboard design. Here's a picture of a common Apple IIe:
apple2e.jpg


A Mac II looks like this:
MacII.jpg


If we know more about what you're wanting to do or an idea of a game you wanted to play or remember we can probably point you the right direction. Price wise for an Apple IIe with monitor, if you can find it local it shouldn't be more than $100. Otherwise it will cost a bit to ship to your area for any auction. Keep an eye out on craigslist and ebay (search for items within X distance of your zip that you could acquire) and you'll hopefully find a nice one. You could also update your location in your profile here and we'll know if you're close by and if we have or see anything.

- John
 

datajerk

Experienced Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
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You stated you didn't want an emulator, but that is the best place to start. I would visit virtualapple.org and play a few games there to determine if you want a IIe or IIgs system.

If you just want to get started cheap (~$50US), then get a beat up Apple IIc. Everything you need is integrated and ready to go and you can connect to your TV.
 
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Dec 4, 2012
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The thing is I have been into retro game collecting for about a year and a SJ documentary lead me here. I would love to just own a piece of history and add this to a sub section of my game collection. I don't have any specific games in mind.
 

Corey986

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Well if you are really into gaming, the right way to do this is to buy an Apple IIe, you should be able get one (don't bother with a monitor for gaming, you should be able to get one with an RF modulator or just buy one online.) I would also suggest getting a CF Card for the machine as well so you don't need to use disks... http://dreher.net/?s=projects/CFforAppleII&c=projects/CFforAppleII/main.php I think they are sold out now, but will be making more in the future. You could use disks until then.

If you have a little extra money, then you could buy a IIgs, but you would want a monitor for it, since it will have a better resolution than a normal TV could display.

My suggestion is google around for old magazines that have been "scanned" to PDF and read up... Moving into vintage computers isn't as easy as buying an Atari 2600 and a few cartridges so you will want to do a bit of research. But vintage computing can be a lot of fun and thanks to Wreck It Ralph will become more popular as kids want to play the vintage games depicted in the movie.
 
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Dec 4, 2012
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Yeah, it was Steve. Also, I'm more interested in a working model mostly to display, I suck at games and have no plans on playing them. I'm actually building a game history display and I want to be able to show its games, not really play them.so what exactly would I need to get for a nice display?
Like these I'm guessing.
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dk5p7RjmlpQ
 
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datajerk

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Oct 25, 2012
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Yeah, it was Steve.
The Jason Scott documentary "Get Lamp" is excellent if you want an in-depth report on the history of interactive fiction (text adventures). Somehow when I saw the letters SJ my dyslexic brain interpreted differently. The documentary is freely available from archive.org.

Also, I'm more interested in a working model mostly to display, I suck at games and have no plans on playing them. I'm actually building a game history display and I want to be able to show its games, not really play them.so what exactly would I need to get for a nice display?
IMHO, Nothing looks more iconic than an Apple II, II+ or IIe with a matching display and floppy drives. The Apple II was the first mass-market consumer computer with color graphics. It was built for games. OTOH, a Apple II or II+ with a small color TV may be more inline with the late '70s early '80s gaming scene. I'm not a gamer (well I am, but only coin-ops), so others will have to weigh in on the most iconic Apple II gaming look.

To complete your display, you must have this as your backdrop: http://artscene.textfiles.com/intros/APPLEII/.thumbs.html :)
 
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Dec 4, 2012
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I'm looking on eBay and have no idea what to look for. Will it be too much trouble for you guys to point out some good links, I'm in California.
 

barythrin

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Oct 5, 2005
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Texas
I'm not sure we've narrowed much down yet but in general, look for one that's tested and shown working if you can. You'll probably want/need a floppy drive and they may not know or say but you'll want one with a superserial card so you can use adtpro to transfer disk images to and from. Monitor is optional I guess if you connect it to a TV or vcr.

I'd recommend doing an advanced search for systems within driving distance of your zip code and see what's out there.
 

vwestlife

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IMHO, Nothing looks more iconic than an Apple II, II+ or IIe with a matching display and floppy drives. The Apple II was the first mass-market consumer computer with color graphics. It was built for games.

It depends on what you consider "mass market". The first Apple computer squarely aimed at home use was the IIc in 1984. The II+ and IIe were school and business machines, and did not sell well to consumers because they were too expensive (more expensive, in fact, than even the IBM PC!).

The first actual "mass market" computer sold at retail stores like K-Mart was the Commodore VIC-20, which was also the home computer to sell a million units. I've also heard that 98% of the VIC-20's program library consisted of games.

So while the Apple II series was highly influential, the real truth is that Apple was never a sales leader, and in fact never has been when it comes to computers. The Apple II is the computer that almost everybody used in school in the 1980s (except in Texas where Radio Shack/Tandy had a strong local influence), but almost nobody used at home.
 
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