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Super Socket 7 board without IDE/FDC/etc.?

Raven

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I doubt it, but do these exist? I'd like to use my own cards for these things but feel silly making a redundant system. Just thought I'd ask.

Edit: Oh and before anybody questions the relevance of Super Socket 7 in a P1 forum, I use them with P1 chips to attain higher clocks using the high bus speeds.
 

Agent Orange

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Can't you turn off the 'onboard' stuff in the BIOS? I have at least one 486 mobo that you can do that to, then cram full it with your own stuff.
 

Raven

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Yeah I guess I can do that, it just seems silly to do so when you already have them built-in though, ya know?
 

Neon_WA

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the latest board i have without IDE/FDC/etc is Octek socket 4

EDIT : just looked thru my pile of boards & found a socket 5 without IDE/FDC.. some Taiwanese no name brand with ALI chipset (8059 Rev 1.0)
 
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Mau1wurf1977

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Yeah I guess I can do that, it just seems silly to do so when you already have them built-in though, ya know?

My two SS7 boards (Aopen AX59 Pro and Iwill XA100 Plus) allow you to disable FDD and IDE controllers through the BIOS.

You mentioned you are using Pentium 1 chips...

Do these run at a higher FSB (e.g. 100) as long as you adjust the multi so that the frequency doesn't go to high? I am interested in this because of my current "Slow down project" where I disable L1 and L2 caches for old DOS games.

I have done heaps of tests and the FSB has the biggest impact in performance. The chip type also matters. A K6-2 is ideal to cover a 386DX-25 to 486DX2-50. The Cyrix 6x86 is a pocket rocket without cache. It goes from min. 386DX-40 to a 486DX2-66. My chip is a 200L and doesn't go higher than 83x2. Looking at getting another chip with a higher multi, so I can also test 100x2...

I don't have any Pentium chips but got some 233s coming and was hoping that they would also "take" 100 MHz FSB so I can add the Pentium into my tests results!

Thanks!
 

Raven

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Yes, they run at the higher FSB just fine.

I have a Tillamook 266Mhz that I clock to 300Mhz @ 100MhzFSB*3. I'm going to get a circuit writer pen and use it to bridge two pins and OC to 400Mhz @ 100Mhz*4, but haven't done it yet.

You could get a 200Mhz Pentium MMX to run at 100MhzFSB*2 just fine in a board like this, if it supports a 2x multiplier.

With modern cooling techniques you can really push these chips far - heat pipes, arctic silver, etc..

You ought to be able to OC the 233Mhz Pentium to 300Mhz easily on a system like this provided you give it ample cooling. It depends on the available multipliers, but you might be able to get closer to stock speed if you wanted to. Most SS7 boards also support 66Mhz and even 60Mhz bus, so if nothing else you can certainly run them that way.
 

Tetrium

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I've found that most (S)S7 boards won't have a larger heatsink fit as there'll always be some component blocking it. largest heatsink that will usually fit are the Intel stock celeron aluminium HSF's which clip on the heatsink, have that Intel hologram on the fan and make a -terrible!!- humming noise which I can't stand! They are about 5cm to 6cm (basically the dimentions of the socket itself).
I used one of these heatsinks on my GA-5AX with a different fan mounted on it to cool the K6-3-400 that's currently in it now.
It's a shame none of my copper HSF's will fit any of my S7 boards.

And about the P1mmx, they should be able to run at 2.5x100 no problem ;)
 

Mau1wurf1977

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Sounds good!

I had some issues with my Iwill board (data corruption on the CF card) so currently back to using the good old 440BX. However when the Pentium CPUs arrive I will go back to SS7 using the Aopen board and see how this one behaves.

I also ran into the cooler issue, however one cooler did fit and I just screwed a new fan onto it and it works very well.
 

FishFinger

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I've found that most (S)S7 boards won't have a larger heatsink fit as there'll always be some component blocking it. largest heatsink that will usually fit are the Intel stock celeron aluminium HSF's which clip on the heatsink, have that Intel hologram on the fan and make a -terrible!!- humming noise which I can't stand! They are about 5cm to 6cm (basically the dimentions of the socket itself).
I used one of these heatsinks on my GA-5AX with a different fan mounted on it to cool the K6-3-400 that's currently in it now.
It's a shame none of my copper HSF's will fit any of my S7 boards.

You can fit an Athlon heatsink to a Socket 7 if you don't mind trimming it slightly to clear the components near the socket. I've got one on my K6 - it's about 80x60x50mm. I had the cut a chunk off one corner, and file down another slightly, but now I can run it fanless up to about 300MHz, and above that it only needs a quiet 5V fan to stay cool enough.

Dsc00003.jpg Dsc00005.jpg Dsc00004.jpg
 

Mau1wurf1977

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Nice!

That's the cooler that came with one of my SS7 boards. I just screwed a new fan ontop of it, works fine...

dsc01882x.jpg
 

Raven

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I may well end up doing that since I have plenty of newer coolers but nothing beefy for a S7.

That's a really nice heatsink Mau1wurf1977, btw. Better than an Athlon one because it's designed to be as wide as possible while dodging components, heh. I don't suppose you'd sell that beast? :p
 

Tetrium

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You can fit an Athlon heatsink to a Socket 7 if you don't mind trimming it slightly to clear the components near the socket. I've got one on my K6 - it's about 80x60x50mm. I had the cut a chunk off one corner, and file down another slightly, but now I can run it fanless up to about 300MHz, and above that it only needs a quiet 5V fan to stay cool enough.

View attachment 4613 View attachment 4614 View attachment 4615
How can you cut a chunk of metal out of the heatsink? Sorry, I'm not particularly handy when it comes to working with metal and such.
Btw, your 2nd pic shows 2 caps are bulging of which one is starting to leak. You'd better do something about it if you're still using that board.
 

Mau1wurf1977

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I may well end up doing that since I have plenty of newer coolers but nothing beefy for a S7.

That's a really nice heatsink Mau1wurf1977, btw. Better than an Athlon one because it's designed to be as wide as possible while dodging components, heh. I don't suppose you'd sell that beast? :p

The cooler came with one of the 2 boards I got. Seeing it was the only one that fit, I have no choice but to hang on to it ;-)
 

MV75

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How can you cut a chunk of metal out of the heatsink? Sorry, I'm not particularly handy when it comes to working with metal and such.
Btw, your 2nd pic shows 2 caps are bulging of which one is starting to leak. You'd better do something about it if you're still using that board.

Dremel. It's only aluminium.
 

FishFinger

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How can you cut a chunk of metal out of the heatsink? Sorry, I'm not particularly handy when it comes to working with metal and such.
Just a hacksaw and a vice - nothing fancy. It's only aluminium so it's really easy to cut.

Btw, your 2nd pic shows 2 caps are bulging of which one is starting to leak. You'd better do something about it if you're still using that board.
Well spotted, thanks.
 

Dave Farquhar

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How can you cut a chunk of metal out of the heatsink? Sorry, I'm not particularly handy when it comes to working with metal and such.
Btw, your 2nd pic shows 2 caps are bulging of which one is starting to leak. You'd better do something about it if you're still using that board.

Working with metal isn't as scary as it first seems. The main difference between working with metal and working with plastic or wood is that you use files and blades with finer teeth. There's a lot you can do with a hacksaw with a fine-toothed blade and a file.

And the nice thing about heatsinks is they're made of soft metals. Aluminum and copper are easier to cut and file than steel.

There are a number of very good, old books on Google Books about metalworking. The books that were written in the early 1900s are nice, because they're all about hand tools, and the tricks still work today. I have a Dremel and I use it, but there are a lot of jobs that you can do entirely, or mostly, by hand. I probably use my hand tools at least as often. It's fun.
 

Raven

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The cooler came with one of the 2 boards I got. Seeing it was the only one that fit, I have no choice but to hang on to it ;-)

I have lots of Socket 7 coolers that are for ordinary applications (i.e., not for massively overclocked Tillamook chips like mine) and would trade you two coolers (hsf) + money for it.. ;D)
 

Chuck(G)

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Metalworking is far more varied that wood or plastic working and is capable of precision not possible in the other materials.

Nonferrous (copper, brass, etc.) are very easy to work and amenable to a wide variety of cold-working methods using nothing more than simple hand tools Nonferrous metals can be joined by welding, brazing and soldering. A good place to start to learn.
 
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