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Unknown 1802-Based System

acgs

Experienced Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2022
Messages
129
Glad I found something that helped out!

I want to be clear, though. The Jameco ad doesn't specifically state that the keyboard is from a Vydec. That's only my conclusion based on how electronics re-sellers worked back then. I remember, for example, finding a homebrewing article that listed a Radioshack part number for surplus TI-99/4A keyboards. Radioshack had apparently bought up TI's stock after they dropped the TI-99 line.

My conclusion is backed up somewhat by this article in the Dec. 2, 1981 issue of the NY times:

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/12/02/...lant-and-lays-off-1100-in-office-company.html

Since Exxon was "restructuring" 10 months BEFORE the Jameco ad, and had found/acquired 2 newer word processor systems from Compucorp, it seems likely that they dropped the Vydec line and sold their surplus stock of parts. In my opinion, that is probably how Jameco came to be selling them.

It would also explain why the keyboard was so much cheaper: surplus overstock can be bought for a song.
 

DeltaDon

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
Messages
604
Location
Dutchess County, New York, USA
My Quest Super Elf was outfitted with a Jameco keyboard connected to the Netronics RS232 terminal board when I expanded it to use a serial terminal, but not anything like NeXT has attached to his machine. So no help with pin ID.
 

Bruce Tomlin

Experienced Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2010
Messages
177
Location
San Antonio, TX
Here's a better disassembly of the code.

I've been working on an interactive disassembler and have been disassembling everything I can find to test it. 1802 is particularly annoying to disassemble because of the split address loads, but I learned a few things. Once I figured out the "macro" that it used for subroutine calls, it went a lot faster.

Definitely this is some version of that keyboard, but someone went to the trouble of making a lid with punch-outs to match the keyboard. And the 6847 is an interesting choice for video, it's not really high quality, but it gives you a display that works on a regular TV set with little trouble.
 

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  • 1802-macbug.zip
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NeXT

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
7,226
Location
Kamloops, BC, Canada
I finally tracked down a small-ish color TV that had manual tuning. Ironically for an RCA microprocessor it's an RCA TV. This uses that old style mechanical tuning where each "channel" has its own adjustment for coarse tuning and then you let AFC lock it in the rest of the way. I just turned that off, tuned it in and we got a clean color picture.

IMG_4247.JPG
 

acgs

Experienced Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2022
Messages
129
Nice system, NeXT. I would've bought that back then, if I'd seen it at a computer store. I've always thought whoever put this together did a nice job of making it look professional. But, somehow, that "monitor" makes it look even more like it was mass marketed.

The screen size looks spot on for this computer, too. Amazing how the right match-up of vintage tech makes everything work just right, isn't it?
 
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